ChromaticSoul :: The Blog

Posts Tagged ‘megapixels

Megapixel junkies can find their next fix in Hasselblad’s latest medium-format creation, the H4D-200MS. The camera boasts an amazing 200-Mpixel resolution, and was announced at Photokina last year. To put that in perspective, most professional DSLRS hover in the 20-Mpixel range. Hasselblad’s newest camera is about 10 times greater than that.

 

Medium-format, for those who don’t know, refers to a format of film photography larger than the standard 24mm by 36mm, known as 35mm, but smaller than the 4- by 5-inch format, known as large format. Digitally, the sensor is larger than a 35mm sensor; it could have dimensions of 33.1 by 44.2mm.

Hasselblad dominates the medium-format category, and it has been a popular option for decades since World War II. There are several models currently available in the H4D line: 31, 40, 50, 60, and now the 200. The H4D-200MS, specifically, comes as the third entry in a small line of multishot(MS) cameras: H3DII-39MS and H4D-50.

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How many megapixels you need depends on the how you are going to use your images. Here are some common uses:

Viewing On Megapixels Needed
Computer Monitor / Online 1-3 megapixels
6×4 prints 2 megapixels
10×8 inch prints 5 megapixels
14×11 inch prints or larger 7 megapixels

If you only enjoy your photos on your computer screen, or uploading to a photo website to share with friends, you really only need a 1 megapixel camera. That is because your computer monitor is usually about 1000×1000 pixels = 1 megapixel! I’d err on the safe side and use a 3 megapixel camera or higher to enable cropping though, as I discuss below.

When you print your images, you will need more megapixels. If your megapixel count isn’t enough for the size of image you print, your images won’t look sharp.

Use the above table as a guide for the number of megapixels you need. Notice how I say “14×11 inch prints or larger” on the last line of the table. You only really need a 7 megapixel camera for any prints larger than 14×11. Even huge 30×40 posters. That’s because we normally stand further away from larger prints, so we don’t notice when they are less sharp!

The above came from an article on Digital Photo Secrets. To learn more like “What are megapixels” and “Why you might need more megapixels” visit Digital Photo Secrets.

Back in December PopPhoto did a review of the up-and-coming 10 megapixel D-SLRs. At that time, the top ones reviewed included: the Nikon D80, Pentax K10D, and of course my favorite…the Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi. Today PopPhoto has an Exclusive Review of the Nikon D40x. According to the article,

As for the specs of the new camera — other than the 10MP imaging, addition of ISO 100, a boost in framing rate, and a drop in flash-sync speed — it’s the same camera as the D40. Not similar, not derived from, but exactly the same camera: controls, menus, chassis, autofocus, metering, the works. So it has the same strengths and weaknesses of the D40, which we tested in March 2007.