ChromaticSoul :: The Blog

Posts Tagged ‘strobist

I was busy with the new baby and so I’m a couple days late with the latest Lighting 102 Assignment. I had fun with this. The first was taken with an orange filter and the second with a green filter. Other than that, there is no post-processing. The one strobe used was pointed at a white wall just above the object so that the wall served as a giant softbox.

cooking_orange.jpg

Title: {Untitled}
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Taken: 7 August 2007 at 6:04 a.m.
Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT
Lens: Canon EF 100mm macro
EXIF: ISO 100; 1/250 at f/7.1;
Lighting: 1 strobe with orange filter pointed at white wall

cooking_green.jpg

Title: {Untitled}
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Taken: 7 August 2007 at 6:04 a.m.
Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT
Lens: Canon EF 100mm macro
EXIF: ISO 100; 1/250 at f/7.1;
Lighting: 1 strobe with green filter pointed at white wall

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I’ve been waiting to see what the next lesson for Lighting 102 will be and I happened to come across this great discussion on Specular Highlights:

To control specular highlights on a highly reflective object, you are not lighting the object. Rather you are lighting the area that the object is reflecting back at you. And the portion of your subject that does not reflect can be lit on an entirely different plane, yielding yet more lighting control (Strobist.com).

And today,the next lesson, Cooking Light, has been posted:

The first full assignment for Lighting 102 is deceptively simple. You’ll be using what we have discussed in both the position and light source sections. The assignment is to photograph one or more kitchen utensils – knives, forks, spoons, whisks – whatever you like. The look you are going or is that of ordinary object elevated to high art. Or at least commercial art, as this is the kind of thing that might appear as a catalog cover or in a calendar or on the wall of one of those ubiquitous “fast casual” restaurants (Strobist.com).

Finally, be sure to check out the great article on Pocket Wizards. No, it’s not the technical, helpful, tutorial kind of post. It’s just plain fun and funny.

Lighting Mods has an excellent post on Apparent Light Size. Apparent Light Size was a previous exercise of the Strobist‘s Lighting 102 course. I really like the way Rui has made this post. First, it doesn’t just show the photos with little inscriptions of EXIF data. Second, it does show the entire setup with numerous variations so that the reader not only reads about how the lighting setup was done but you get to see the setup and the result. Thank you Rui.

I’ve manipulated the actual color of the flower without making any adjustments to color. All I did was change the temperature from 4750 to 6750. The temperature scale affects how warm or cool a photo looks. However, in this setting, the warmth added results in an entirely different look for the same flower. It’s interesting that the shadow on the right is still black and the highlight on the lower left corner is still blue (light showing through the same background as on the right).

pink-liatris.jpg

Title: PinkLiatris
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Taken: 01 July 2007 at 5:22 p.m.
Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT
Lens: Canon EF 100mm macro
EXIF: ISO 200; 25 sec. at f/11

Using aperture priority instead of manual results very long exposures. However, as you can see, the result can be accomplished with patience. It’s interesting that the background showed up blue since it’s a piece of black satin. The light behind the material resulted in the blue tone.

purple-and-lavendar.jpg

Title: Lavendar Liatris
Location: Bakersfield, CA
Taken: 01 July 2007 at 5:22 p.m.
Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT
Lens: Canon EF 100mm macro
EXIF: ISO 200; 25 sec. at f/11

For those of you who have been anxiously awaiting the next lesson from Strobist to be posted — take a look. This week we’re working on Spectacular Highlight Control.

Last week we talked about the diffused highlight, the shadow and the diffused highlight to shadow transfer area. But there is a fourth area, which is usually brighter than the diffused highlight. The specular highlight is nothing more than the reflection of the light source in the object you are lighting. This reflection is an often overlooked control in lighting design. In it’s most basic form, it is simple to grasp and to predict. Explored more fully, it allows you to completely manipulate the tonal structure of your subject. (via Strobist)

strobist-assignment.jpgI had several photos I took for this next assignment. I didn’t use an umbrella but I did take advantage of various other ways to diffuse light. You can check out the series of photos on my flickr page. Basically I set the flash on Tele and shot it above the seeds with and without a snoot. I also set the flash on Wide and aimed it toward the white ceiling with and without a dome lid atop of it.

I got to thinking that the point was to show that lighting up close with flash can be just as soft as lighting from afar (if you know what you’re doing). My photos in setup #1 and #2 (with and without the snoot set from just over the seeds) just didn’t look that soft, so I tried another attempt. I used setup #1 (no snoot, just close flash from above) and this time I placed the flash on Wide, added the 28mm wide angle lens filter, placed just the internal dome of my Gary Fong lightsphere over the flash. NOW we’re getting some softening with a flash closeup.

The photos I show here show two different lighting setups but both are, in my opinion, soft and don’t have that harsh flash look to them. The photo on top was taken with the flash bouncing off of the ceiling. The photo on the bottom was taken using the technique I discuss in the previous paragraph.

I don’t know if I’m getting exactly what David is teaching, but I am learning that I can control my flash better thanks to the practice and helpful advise from the Stobist Flickr Group.


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